Walking with toddlers

This toddler, in particular:

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“…though she be but little she is fierce”*

Walking with B is frustrating (when she goes too slow), worrying (when she runs off), maddening (when she won’t come back); but also interesting, amusing and good exercise (particularly when chasing after her). She is being a stereotypical toddler at the moment -not doing as she’s been asked 99 % of the time. Fortunately, there is still that 1%…for now. It’s all very tiring because everything is a bit of a battle, from getting dressed in the morning to going to bed at night. Our current system (haha) is to take away things from her if she doesn’t do what she’s told, e.g. no stories before bed; no sweets, etc. [Yes, we let her eat sweets, sorry not sorry*][*what does that even mean?] but quite often it doesn’t work because she’ll do the bad thing anyway and just lose her ‘treats’. Not sure what else to do, though. I think she’s too young for the naughty step and I’m not convinced this is the best way forward anyway – it seems a bit mean to me (as it boils down to withholding affection) but I realise lots of parents find it useful, so what do I know? Not a lot, is the answer to that question, and therein lies (part of) the problem! Answers on a postcard, please?

In other news, B’s speech is very good for her age (so I say as her proud mother) and she has discovered (pretend) reading on her own. Her favourite book to ‘read’ by herself is currently Winnie-the-Pooh’s Little Book of Feng Shui**. Make of that what you will…

*A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Act 3, Scene 2)

** I don’t believe in feng shui. I do believe in Winnie-the-Pooh.

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2 thoughts on “Walking with toddlers

  1. She sounds a wonderful little girl and very bright and curious about the world. Though very exhausting for her poor mother 🙂

    I never used the naughty step thing either. It just didn’t feel right to me – it seemed like you were against them, not on their side.

    What I did about the sweets issue was to allow them to eat biscuits, cakes and chocolate (in moderation) but I never bought them actual sweets (or fizzy drinks). If they got them in a party bag I discreetly got rid of them. So what they never had they never missed.

    It did seem to work as they are in their thirties and my son has never had a filling and my daughter has just had one small one. Though I know dentists don’t do as many fillings as they used to. Also when they were about nine (I think) the dentist painted some protective stuff on their back teeth.

    I think B will be an early reader. She is lucky her Mum is a librarian 🙂

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